Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria

By Yari Nieves-Rivera, Editor Emeritus

A picture of Yari’s family’s neighborhood

For one third of my life, the little city of Comerío, hugged by the mountains that make up Puerto Rico’s dorsal spine, was the extent of my entire world. There were towns that bordered, like planets that can barely be reached by our best scientists, but they never mattered to me. The twenty-thousand people that lived there were the only people that mattered to me. My family were the most important. I was proud to be a Nieves, a Rivera, as people in my town always recognized the names. There were a lot of us, of course, but we were always a part of the family.

Today, as of September 21st, 2017, I know nothing of the 20,000 people that inhabit my little world.

Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico as a High Category 4 storm, only two miles away from being a Category 5. For reference, that is equivalent to having a F5 tornado covering the entire island for six to eight hours, mixed with rainfall, thunderstorms and actual tornadoes. The last time a hurricane of this magnitude hit the island nation was in 1928, when my great-grandmother was eighteen years old and about to start her own family. My grandfather was only months away from being born. The San Felipe II Hurricane (known in the United States as Okeechobee), is the only Category 5 hurricane to have ever hit the island, and it displaced 500,000 of its citizens, and killed 300. This storm followed the same trajectory as Maria, and caused almost an equal amount of devastation to the island.

At this moment, not much is known about the center of the island. With communication lines lost at the beginning of the storm, all we know is that damage is extensive. They have already declared that power on the island will not be restored for 4-6 months (at the most, a year). As I’m writing this, many Puerto Ricans outside of the island are desperately trying to communicate with their family members through Zello, an online walkie-talkie. There, they have been connecting and relaying information with each other to both comfort and inform those who have no way of speaking to their loved ones. Only two death has been reported on the entire island thus far in the city of Bayamon, but nobody knows what to expect. All that is known is that Puerto Rico had already been suffering from poor infrastructure and Hurricane Irma, and the damage caused could be catastrophic.

Comerío, close to the heart of the island, was founded in 1826 and was originally known as Sabana del Palmar. The name was later changed to honor the local Cacique (Taino Chief), who bears the same name. The history of my little city is little known and little cared for, but it holds the legacy of thousands of people who passed and left their mark. It was most well-known for its agriculture, and it was once called the city of tobacco. My mom, only thirty-seven years old, still remembers sitting below my grandmother’s work tables in the town’s factory as her mother sewed together the leaves of the crop.

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Sunday Funnies!

By Erica Garcia and Victoria Meneses, Courier Cartoonists

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James Logan Women’s Water Polo brings home ANOTHER victory!

By Israel Avila and Daisy Tamayo, Courier Staff Writers

Logan’s Varsity Women’s Water Polo is still undefeated at 7-0, after beating Mission San Jose by a score of 10-2 on Wednesday afternoon.

Although the season has just begun, the team already knows what their strengths and weaknesses are as individuals, and most importantly, as a team.

Haley Pulido, Logan’s goalie, stated that just knowing that the team is there for each other makes her “thrive more, want to be more competitive, and try harder.” However, she believes that one of the team’s main weaknesses is communication: “We need communication all the time or we’re not gonna get anywhere.”

In order to help the team improve, Pulido plans to condition her legs more intensely, because “the main [role] of the goalie is to tread water and you rely on your legs the whole time.”

Another player, Alina Lam, specializes in her arm and her defense. However, she believes she is “in the exclusion box a lot, because [she] gets called a lot for offensive or defensive fouls.” Minimizing her foul trouble is one of her biggest goals this season.

Lam also plans to devote more time to the team, in spite of other extracurricular activities, since the team must remain close together to succeed.

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Should Logan have open-campus lunch?

By Catherine Nguyen and Sheris MendiolaCourier Staff Writers                                                                                              Mary Kay Jimenez-Floyd, Managing Editor

Whether students should be able to have lunch beyond the campus is a heated topic that often sticks to the minds of staff and students.

In recent years, a majority of the Logan students have been yearning to have Open-Campus Lunch. In support for this concept, students cite reasons such as the poor taste of school food, freedom of choice, and lessons for responsibility.

Multiple students cited Open-Campus Lunch as giving “students a wider variety.” For example, sophomore Marisela Arredondo believes that “it gives [us] more options” if students prefer not to buy the Logan food, or lack the time to make their own lunches.

Gracie Davis, a freshman, believes that this increased range of lunches would benefit the kids’ well-being as students.

Similarly, Jordan Parish, a 9th grader, says that “It will teach kids how to actually be responsible and manage time.”

Senior Holly Caling, however, believes that there should be some restrictions: “We should only have off campus lunch for seniors. If your GPA is over a 3.0, you should be able to go off campus for lunch.”

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Mr. Pacheco, a DACA recipient, shares his story as an immigrant in the United States

By Simran Kalkat and Alyssa Barquin, Courier Editor-in-Chief and Courier Staff Writer

On September 5, President Trump announced the end to the DACA program.

Edgar Pacheco, the family services assistant at Logan. Photo by Israel Avila

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program protects young undocumented immigrants so that they can work in the United States without the fear of deportation. With a school as diverse as James Logan, there are sure to be many students enrolled in the DACA program. Last week we talked to Mr. Edgar Pacheco, the family services assistant at James Logan High School who migrated to the United States at 13, and enrolled in the DACA program at 23.

Coming to America as an adolescent who didn’t know the language served as a disadvantage to him as he was behind his peers and was placed in EL classes.

“It feels like you don’t belong in this country, and also in this school, which is supposed to be like a second home to any of the students,” said Pacheco.

Due to difficulties such as the language barrier, Pacheco dropped out of high school in his junior year and took up a job at McDonald’s.

“I felt like I wasn’t doing something good for myself and the community, but I was stuck there because I didn’t have any other option,”

In hopes of getting his GED, Pacheco resumed his education at the New Haven Adult School. However, when he scored high on the first test, his teacher convinced him to take his GED right away which he passed on his first try. Pacheco then went straight to community college which proved to be difficult since he was unable to receive any financial aid, and had to pay for all classes, books and materials from pocket. After community college, he transferred to San Francisco State University. At that point DACA came into California and Pacheco was able to receive financial aid without worrying about any documentation. He went back to school for the sole purpose of giving back to his community.

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The problem with Logan’s Chromebook repair time

By Stacy Park, Sarah McMurry, and Sahar Kharie, Courier Staff Writers

The faulty Chromebook repair system has been a problem at James Logan and people are getting tired of it.

For years, many students felt very displeased with the Chromebook service.

Chromebook Photo: Alex Washburn / Wired

“I turned in my Chromebook a year ago because the screen was fading away. However, after getting it back in a month, I have found that the screen was still black and unrepaired. I have given up trying to fix it and have bought a new computer,” said  Jessica Lee, a senior.

“To be honest, I believe the system is inadequate because there have been too many Chromebooks that are not left unfixed.”

While many students are disappointed with the Chromebook repair system, there are some who have a positive outlook.

“I  have turned in my Chromebook last year at the end of the first semester and have not gotten it back since. I currently have a loner, and I am very content with it. I know that many students have poor loners with incompatible chargers,” said Serena Lee, an 11th grader.

Lee also mentioned why she thinks Chromebook repairs at Logan are a haphazard.

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Logan Football logs first win of the season against Castro Valley

By Joshua Vasquez, Courier Staff Writer

The James Logan Mighty Colts played their third non-league game of the season this past Friday, against the Castro Valley High Trojans.

The Colts, who played their first home game of the season last week against Freedom High Eagles (Oakley, California), looked to gain positive momentum going into the remainder of the season after losing to Freedom 55-6. Logan made costly errors throughout the game turning the ball over 5 times, including late in the game on Freedom’s 2 yard line.

After the game, senior RB and captain, Kesean Cohen, stated, “I feel like we just didn’t take care of the ball and capitalize on our opportunities. We gave them that game and I truly believe we were the more physical team; we just didn’t execute when we needed too. It’s behind us now though, and our mindset now is on Castro Valley.”

Castro Valley, already 2-1 this season, was coming off a big win against Newark Memorial 61-34. With a tough to beat Wing-T Offense, the odds were in their favor. When asked what their most difficult task this week would be, Junior LB Kimo Fukofuka said “We all have to do our own individual jobs this week, whether it’s the D-line fighting pressure and not getting trapped or myself and the backers making the correct reads and triggering. We all have to do our part and  play team defense in order to be successful.”

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Queens of the Stone Age comes out with their seventh album, “Villians”

By Horace Assar and Princess Ganutan, Courier Staff Writer

Queens of the Stone Age may be generation x’s best contemporary hard rock band aside from the Foo Fighters and Nine Inch Nails.

Josh Homme, the mastermind of QOTSA, would rather eat dirt than bow down to anyone else’s standards. With the production from Mark Ronson and new drummer Jon Theodore, the album creates a funky and stoner rock sound. You might know Mark Ronson from the song “Uptown Funk.”

They have a secured reputation because of their past albums like “Songs for the Deaf”,” …Like Clockwork”, and “Lullabies to Paralyze”. Not only have they release legendary albums but they have also worked with various other groups and artists such as the Arctic Monkeys, Eagles of Death Metal, Them Crooked Vultures, Desert Sessions and Iggy Pop.

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Sunday Funnies on Monday!

By Erica Garcia and Victoria Meneses, Courier Cartoonists

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Logan student comes out in support for Trump’s decision on DACA

By Horace Assar, Courier Staff Writer

Trump supporter, Carlos Gonzalez, shares opinion on Trump ending the DACA program. He supports Trump’s decision and wants to tell people why it is good for this country and its people.

“Illegal immigrants are Illegal immigrants and they cannot stay. We should not be using our resources to educate people that should not be in the United States in the first place. In California alone we used $34.84 billion on illegal immigrants every year and $15.6 of that is used on the education of illegal immigrants. That is a lot of money that can go to real American boys and girls who go to school everyday. Trump ending DACA is something I completely agree with and a huge win for America. They have broken a law by simply being here since they are undocumented, while at the same time cheating others who wait to get their documents to live in the USA. I am completely fine with people coming into my Country legally but when they walk in without permission and start using resources such as welfare and are actually cared for and helped by sanctuary cities, it makes my blood boil.”

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