Archives for August 2015

Chinese WWII pilot: From war hero, to outcast, to hero again

An undated portrait of pilot Long Qiming's early family sits in the apartment of Long Wenjun, his eldest son, in Chongqing, China, on Aug. 13, 2015. Qiming helped defend China, his adopted homeland, endure World War II by flying cargo planes over the Himalayas to resupply the Chinese resistance to Japan. Pictured in this portait are Long Qiming, right, his wife, Peng Tianming, and Long Wenjun. (Yue Wu/McClatchy/TNS)

An undated portrait of pilot Long Qiming’s early family sits in the apartment of Long Wenjun, his eldest son, in Chongqing, China, on Aug. 13, 2015. Qiming helped defend China, his adopted homeland, endure World War II by flying cargo planes over the Himalayas to resupply the Chinese resistance to Japan. Pictured in this portait are Long Qiming, right, his wife, Peng Tianming, and Long Wenjun. (Yue Wu/McClatchy/TNS)

By Stuart Leavenworth
McClatchy Washington Bureau (TNS)

CHONGQING, China – By all accounts, Long Qiming was a Chinese hero during World War II. He piloted cargo planes over the Himalayas, helping to resupply China after Japan’s military had cut off land routes into the country’s interior.

Yet after WWII and the founding of the People’s Republic of China, Long paid a harsh price for his decision to stay in his adopted homeland, mainland China. Long was born in Hong Kong, so he held a British passport. He also had flown planes for the 14th Air Force Chinese-American Composite Wing, an arm of China’s nationalist government.
When Mao Zedong and his Communist Party seized power in China, both of these connections _ Long’s British passport and his collaboration with U.S. and nationalist forces _ came into question. At the start of China’s Cultural Revolution, the government stopped treating him like a war hero. Instead, according to his son, Long Wenjun, “they thought he was a spy.”

In a recent interview at his Chongqing apartment, Long Wenjun recounted the ups and downs of his father’s roller coaster life. From an early age, his father was a refugee, then a war hero, then an outcast and finally a hero again.
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Moment of Silence for Drowned Alumnus

McWay_Falls_Big_Sur_May_2011_002

McWay Falls at Big Sur. Wikipedia image

 

Courier Staff Report

Nearly 4,000 James Logan High School went quiet Monday during second period announcements, when Principal Abhi Brar invoked a moment of silence in memory of Medina Faraz, a 2013 Logan graduate, who died after falling off a cliff in Big Sur on Friday.

According to various reports, Faraz, 20, was walking along  the edge of a precipice above the ocean at McWay Falls, near Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park in the Big Sur area of California’s central coast, when she fell and plunged into the water below.  After Monterey County Search and Rescue and California State Parks recovered the body,  officials made a preliminary finding that she drowned.

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Thousands head back to school

Courier Staff Report

About 3700 students showed up for the first day of the 2015-16 school year Wednesday.  School officials say the process went fairly smoothly.

New Principal Abhi Brar told The Courier Thursday that the roll-out of the new school year went well, except for a few problems with classrooms and identification cards.

Brar said that the opening of the school was smoothed by the work of about 25 parent volunteers, who helped hand out schedules in Colt Court and Memorial Square.  As a result, the line of students needing their schedules was largely eliminated by the 8:20 a.m. start of first period.  In previous years, hundreds of students waited for their schedules well into the school day.  Brar said helpers from the Educational Services Center, also known as the district office, also helped pare down the line.

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